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JellyInFrisco

Page history last edited by happyjackiec3 4 years, 10 months ago

Jelly! is coming to Frisco, Texas

 

Jelly in Frisco (TX) is just getting started. Add your name to the list below if you'd like to join/organize/support/help!

 

We're just getting started on creating the very first Frisco Jelly to bring casual coworking to the north Dallas area.  You can commute to the workplace. If you are 18 and do not have a license yet, you need to take a in Texas. Anyone in the Plano, Frisco and Allen areas are welcome to join us.  Things are just getting underway so we'll update you when we have more information. We're hoping to host the first Jelly sometime in the next month.  We are scouting for a good location at the moment - so if you are aware of any, please post them below.

 

What is "Jelly" ?

 

Jelly is an every-so-often casual coworking session. Anyone is welcome to come, bring your laptop, art supplies, or whatever, and work alongside other creative, fun people. Jelly was started in March 2006 in NYC by Amit Gupta and and Luke Crawford. They chose the name Jelly because they conceived the idea while eating jellybeans.

 

See workatjelly.com and this blog post for more background.

 

Interested in participating when it's up and running?

(Leave a contact link or other info)

  • Ashok Nare - Please feel free to contact me about this Jelly!
    • Email: ashoknare@yahoo.com
    • You can also find me on Twitter -- @ashoknare
  • You're next! Edit this page and add yourself! OR sign up for the CoworkingFrisco meetup group
  • You can also follow CoworkingFrisco on Twitter -- @coworkingfrisco

 

Possible Venues So Far

 

  • Frisco Public Library
  • Main Street Bakery
  • Panera Bread
  • It's a Grind Coffee Shop
  • Add more locations

 

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1. Talk with recent clients Ask agents to provide a list of what they've listed and sold in the past year, with contact information, says Ron Phipps, past president of the Chicago-based National Association of Realtors, or NAR. Before you start calling the names, ask the agent if anyone will be "particularly pleased or particularly disappointed," he says. With past clients, "I'd like to know what the asking price was and then what the sales price was," says William Poorvu, adjunct professor emeritus at Harvard Business School and co-author of "The Real Estate Game: The Intelligent Guide to Decision-making and Investment." And, if you're the seller, ask if these past properties are similar to yours in price, location and other salient features, Poorvu says. What you want is someone who specializes in exactly what you're selling. SHARE THIS STORY LinkedIn Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Email story Another good question for sellers is: How long has the home been on the market?

2. Look up the licensing States will have boards that license and discipline real estate agents in those states, says Phipps. Check with your state's regulatory body to find out if the person is licensed and if there have been any disciplinary actions or complaints, or check to see if the information is posted online.

3. Pick a winner Peer-given awards count, says Phipps. One that really means something is the "Realtor of the Year" designation awarded by the state or local branch of NAR. "These agents are the best as judged by their peers," he says. "That's a huge endorsement."

4. Select an agent with the right credentials Just as doctors specialize, so do real estate agents. And even generalists will get additional training in some areas. So that alphabet soup after the name can be an indication that the person has taken additional classes in a certain specialty of real estate sales. Here's what some of the designations mean:

5. Research how long the agent has been in business You can often find out how long the agent has been selling real estate from the state licensing authority. Or, you can just ask the agent. "If they haven't been in business five years, they're learning on you and that's not good," says Robert Irwin, author of "Tips & Traps When Buying a Home." Ultimately, what you're looking for is someone who is actively engaged in a particular area and price range, says Phipps. You'll want to know what knowledge of those two factors they can demonstrate and "what kind of market presence they have," he says.

6. Look at their current listings Check out an agent's listings online, says Brobeck. Two places to look are the agency's own site and Realtor.com, a website that compiles properties in the Multiple Listing Service into a searchable online database. Most buyers start their search on the Internet, and you want an agent who uses that tool effectively. "A key thing is an attractive presentation on the Web," says Brobeck. You also can look at how closely the agent's listings mirror the property you want to buy or sell. Are they in the same area? Is the price range similar? And does the agent have enough listings to indicate a healthy business but not so many that you'd just be a number?

7. Ask about other houses for sale nearby A good agent should know about other area properties that are available "off the top of his head," says Irwin. Mention a house in your area that's sold recently or is for sale. If the agent knows the property and can give you a few details, that means he or she really knows your area, he says. "You want someone like that who's on top of the market."

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